Primary and Cultured Cells

Stem cell drug screening

All 3 kits contain stem cells, growth factors and markers, to produces 3 key stages of epiblast development.
Kit 1 – Trigger the development of the epiblast
Kit 2 – Trigger the amniotic sac and the posterior, or rear end of the epiblast
Kit 3 – Trigger the amniotic sac and the anterior, or upper end of the epiblast

SKU: 4 Category:

Description

OverviewWhy our testsOur test ApplicationsGet startedData and Publications

Our epiblast model

Using our Epiblast model for drug toxicity screening can identify medication that are unhealthy for pregnant women and if needed our tests can show safer alternatives.

With our EPIBLAST™ test kit you can check if medication stops epiblast development, weakens the amniotic sac, or stops primitive streak development. These deformities can cause stillbirths or miscarriages. Order the kit and screen for these problems with our Epiblast model.

Currently, human clinical stem cell models are poorly represented in drug development with a lack of efficacy assays, genetic heterogeneity, and human disease models. The differentiation and reprogramming strategies are not standardized and are often based on growth factors, making protocols expensive, poorly reproducible and limited in terms of scale up.

With the use of Cellulim’s own model of a synthetic epiblast in a the three-dimensional (3D) biocompatible micro-fluidic flow chambers. Protocols will become less expensive, more reproducible and easier to scale up. Since epiblasts can produce own growth factors for differentiation some protocols will use less growth factors. Using our micro-fluidic flow chambers efficacy of the assay will increases, due to lower fabrication costs, better process control and compactness of the systems.

Our protocol can produce 3 key stages of epiblast development. We will provide 3 kits (to test on 3 key stages of development) with stem cells, growth factors and markers.

Kit 1 – Trigger the development of the epiblast
A three-dimensional biocompatible micro-fluidic flow chamber
One Vial/Capillary of 10 µL with ES or IPS cells (+/- 8000000 cells)
Fresh medium
Matrigel
Growth factor (BM)
Antibodies (OCT4, NANOG and SOX2)

Kit 2 – Trigger the amniotic sac and the posterior, or rear end of the epiblast
A three-dimensional biocompatible micro-fluidic flow chamber
One Vial/Capillary of 10 µL with ES or IPS cells (+/- 8000000 cells)
Fresh medium
Matrigel
Growth factor (BM + BMP-4)
Antibodies (CDX2, EOMES and T)

Kit 3 – Trigger the amniotic sac and the anterior, or upper end of the epiblast
A three-dimensional biocompatible micro-fluidic flow chamber
One Vial/Capillary of 10 µL with ES or IPS cells (+/- 8000000 cells)
Fresh medium
Matrigel
Growth factor (BM + noggin + IWP2)
Antibodies (TFAP2A, NANOG and OCT4)

Get started in a few simple steps.

Medication Kit Medication Kit
Order a kit with
easy-to-follow instructions.
Test Kit instructions Test Kit instructions
Follow the instructions to develop epiblasts
Test your Medication Test your Medication
Use your own protocol for drug screens
Adam, M. P., Polifka, J. E., & Friedman, J. M. (2011, August). Evolving knowledge of the teratogenicity of medications in human pregnancy. In American Journal of Medical Genetics Part C: Seminars in Medical Genetics (Vol. 157, No. 3, pp. 175-182). Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company.

Haas, D. M., Marsh, D. J., Dang, D. T., Parker, C. B., Wing, D. A., Simhan, H. N., … & Parry, S. (2018). Prescription and Other Medication Use in Pregnancy. Obstetrics & Gynecology, 131(5), 789-798.

Food and Drug Administration. (2014) Content and format of labeling for human prescription drug and biological products: requirements for pregnancy and lactation labeling. Fed Regist, 79(233), 72064–72103.

Lo, W. Y., & Friedman, J. M. (2002). Teratogenicity of recently introduced medications in human pregnancy. Obstetrics & Gynecology, 100(3), 465-473.

Sachdeva, P., Patel, B. G., & Patel, B. K. (2009). Drug use in pregnancy; a point to ponder!. Indian journal of pharmaceutical sciences, 71(1), 1.

Smithells, R. W., & Newman, C. G. (1992). Recognition of thalidomide defects. Journal of medical genetics, 29(10), 716.